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Mamedyarov & Grischuk Lead in Beijing After Spectacular 7th Round

  • webmaster
  • on 11/07/13 13:23.

After a most spectacular seventh round in Beijing, Shakhriyar Mamedyarov and Alexander Grischuk are sharing the lead at the FIDE Grand Prix. Mamedyarov quickly beat Veselin Topalov, who all of a sudden got his knight trapped in the middle of the board. Grischuk needed 77 moves and more than 6 hours to grind down Wang Yue in an ending. Sergey Karjakin lost again, this time in what seemed to be a dead drawn ending, against Peter Leko. In a round with five wins for White (!) Vassily Ivanchuk defeated Alexander Morozevich and Wang Hao won against Anish Giri. 

Let's start with that last game, which was in fact the first to end on Thursday. Giri played the Philidor with an early ...exd4, and Wang Hao took with his queen. Then, on move seven, the Chinese played the startling move Bxf7?!! which is known to be incorrect because of Black's tricky reply ...Ke8 and ...c5. However, defending such a position is easier said than done over the board, and the Dutchman just didn't manage. White continued developing his pieces, like a modern Paul Morphy, and he finished the game in 19th century style as well!

Veselin Topalov also lost very quickly, but there was nothing wrong with his opening, on the contrary. He managed to surprise his opponent by taking with the bishop on c3 instead of with the knight, and a few moves later he also gave his other bishop for a knight; a remarkably strong concept. With 20...Nf5! Black would have kept a slight advantage, but instead the Bulgarian decided to "win a pawn", missing the fact that his knight would get trapped.

The third winner of the day was Vassily Ivanchuk, who outcalculated Alexander Morozevich in a complicated middlegame. The Russian sacrificed his d-pawn to create attacking chances against the enemy king, but he missed the simple but strong 26.Ka2! and then there was not much to play for.

Gata Kamky and Boris Gelfand drew a Grünfeld where the Israeli chose a setup with ...c7-c6, just like how his opponent likes to play it when he has the black pieces! Somehow this piece of psychological warfare worked quite well, because Black got out of the opening with a slight advantage. Kamsky managed to avoid serious problems and the players drew on move 51. 

The game between Peter Leko and Sergey Karjakin seemed to be heading to a draw right from the start. Playing against his own Queen's Indian repertoire, the Hungarian couldn't get an opening advantage. The position after move 29 was very drawish and in fact 33...Qxc4 34. Qxc4 Nxc4 35. Kf1 f5 would have forced that draw. Just before the time control, Leko got a slight edge due to more active pieces, and after the wrong plan 35...Qc5?! and 36...Kf8?! things got out of control. Karjakin fought for forty more moves, but the result was never in doubt.

At the end of the day Alexander Grischuk joined Mamedyarov in first place by beating Wang Yue. It was a pity for the Chinese, who had been defending the ending like a lion, but on move 57 he went wrong. Afterwards Grischuk showed the line  57... Rd4 58. Ke3 Rd1 59. Rc8 Ke7 60. Rb8 Rd6 61. Ke4 Re6+ 62. Kd4 Rd6+ 63. Kc4 Rh6 and it's a draw. The rook vs knight ending was winning because 62... Nb7 fails to 63. Ra7! Kb8 64. Rxb7+! Kxb7 65. Kd4 and the pawn ending wins.



Beijing GP 2013 | Scores

Round 1 15:00 CST 04.07.13   Round 2 15:00 CST 05.07.13
Giri 0-1 Karjakin   Karjakin 1-0 Wang Hao
Morozevich ½-½ Wang Yue   Grischuk ½-½ Ivanchuk
Gelfand 0-1 Topalov   Mamedyarov ½-½ Kamsky
Leko ½-½ Mamedyarov   Topalov ½-½ Leko
Kamsky 0-1 Grischuk   Wang Yue ½-½ Gelfand
Ivanchuk ½-½ Wang Hao   Giri ½-½ Morozevich
Round 3 15:00 CST 06.07.13   Round 4 15:00 CST 07.07.13
Morozevich 0-1 Karjakin   Karjakin ½-½ Grischuk
Gelfand 0-1 Giri   Mamedyarov 1-0 Wang Hao
Leko ½-½ Wang Yue   Topalov ½-½ Ivanchuk
Kamsky ½-½ Topalov   Wang Yue 1-0 Kamsky
Ivanchuk 0-1 Mamedyarov   Giri ½-½ Leko
Wang Hao ½-½ Grischuk   Morozevich 1-0 Gelfand
Round 5 15:00 CST 09.07.13   Round 6 15:00 CST 10.07.13
Gelfand ½-½ Karjakin   Karjakin 0-1 Mamedyarov
Leko ½-½ Morozevich   Topalov ½-½ Grischuk
Kamsky 0-1 Giri   Wang Yue 1-0 Wang Hao
Ivanchuk 1-0 Wang Yue   Giri ½-½ Ivanchuk
Wang Hao ½-½ Topalov   Morozevich 1-0 Kamsky
Grischuk 1-0 Mamedyarov   Gelfand ½-½ Leko
Round 7 15:00 CST 11.07.13   Round 8 15:00 CST 12.07.13
Leko 1-0 Karjakin   Karjakin - Topalov
Kamsky ½-½ Gelfand   Wang Yue - Mamedyarov
Ivanchuk 1-0 Morozevich   Giri - Grischuk
Wang Hao 1-0 Giri   Morozevich - Wang Hao
Grischuk 1-0 Wang Yue   Gelfand - Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov 1-0 Topalov   Leko - Kamsky
Round 9 15:00 CST 14.07.13   Round 10 15:00 CST 15.07.13
Kamsky - Karjakin   Karjakin - Wang Yue
Ivanchuk - Leko   Giri - Topalov
Wang Hao - Gelfand   Morozevich - Mamedyarov
Grischuk - Morozevich   Gelfand - Grischuk
Mamedyarov - Giri   Leko - Wang Hao
Topalov - Wang Yue   Kamsky - Ivanchuk
Round 11 13:00 CST 16.07.13        
Ivanchuk - Karjakin        
Wang Hao - Kamsky        
Grischuk - Leko        
Mamedyarov - Gelfand        
Topalov - Morozevich        
Wang Yue - Giri        

Beijing GP 2013 | Round 7 standings

# Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 Points SB
1 Grischuk,Alexander 2780 * 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 5.0/7 17.00
2 Mamedyarov,Shakhriyar 2761 0 * ½ 1 1 1 1 ½ 5.0/7 16.75
3 Leko,Peter 2737 ½ * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 4.0/7 14.50
4 Ivanchuk,Vassily 2733 ½ 0 * ½ ½ 1 1 ½ 4.0/7 14.25
5 Karjakin,Sergey 2776 ½ 0 0 * 1 1 1 ½ 4.0/7 13.00
6 Topalov,Veselin 2767 ½ 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 ½ 3.5/7 10.50
7 Giri,Anish 2734 ½ ½ 0 * ½ 0 1 1 3.5/7 9.25
8 Morozevich,Alexander 2736 ½ 0 0 ½ * ½ 1 1 3.5/7 9.00
9 Wang,Yue 2705 0 ½ 0 ½ * 1 ½ 1 3.5/7 8.75
10 Wang,Hao 2752 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ 1 0 * 2.5/7
11 Gelfand,Boris 2773 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ * ½ 2.0/7
12 Kamsky,Gata 2763 0 ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ * 1.5/7

The 5th Grand Prix takes place 4-16 July, 2013 in Beijing, China. The games start 15:00 CST (09:00 CET, 03:00 EDT); the final round starts two hours earlier. Tournament website: http://beijing2013.fide.com. Photos by Anastasiya Karlovich courtesy of FIDE. Games via TWIC.

Letto 5136 volte 17 commenti
2 voti

Commenti


  • 13 mesi fa

    Marcokim

    @GeniusKJ, the open prep theory is a bit cliche...most games are lost in the middle game and ending. PLenty of opening advantages are nullified in the murky waters of middle game play. Check out the Mamedyarov vs. Topalov.

    I think this cliche was popularised by the Karpov vs. Kasparov match where each side had a team of GMs to prepare with. But with the modern 2700+ GM its rare you will get a game winning advantage early on and take this win home, its the middle game where you have a chance to outplay him. I think Carslen himself said something along those lines.

  • 13 mesi fa

    Balachandar

    Karjakin loses again (against Topalov) and Gelfand beats Ivanchuk in R8.

  • 13 mesi fa

    chessdoggblack

    If anyone has had interest in my wonderful post, you may be happy with this as well. Mamedyarov and Grischuk are no surprise here; both have been great in previous tournaments. I did pick Mamedyarov to win. However, reread my post on "Chucky." For him things are just as he has planned: stay focus and win this tournament. I know you can't believe this one, but it may turn out to be true. So...let's take a walk on the wild side of the chess board shall we. Your move "Chucky." Cool

  • 13 mesi fa

    ChocolateTeapot

    Perhaps Giri was following a line that Nimzowitch quoted in My System: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 Nf6 4. Nc3 Nbd7 5. Bc4 Be7 6. Bxf7+ Kxf7 7. Ng5+ Kg8 8. Ne6 Qe8 9. Nxc7 Qg6 10. Nxa8 Qxg2 11. Rf1 exd4 12. Qxd4 Ne5 13. f4 Nfg4 and wins. Unfortunately he got the move order wrong.

  • 13 mesi fa

    quintessentiald

    In the Giri V Hao game would someone please explain what the next moves are most likely to be. Thanks.

  • 13 mesi fa

    melvinbluestone

    On the Hao-Giri game: I'll accept that white's 7.Bxf7+ is unsound, but when it works against a 2700+ opponent, it's sound enough! Poor Anish must have felt like one of those victims of Anderssen or Morphy back in the 19th century.......

  • 13 mesi fa

    skusamto

    what a round!

  • 13 mesi fa

    Balachandar

    Nice to see Hou Yifan had come to watch the games. 

  • 13 mesi fa

    Adrian_Kinnersley

    I liked the Hao-Giri game! Nice to see that even grandmasters can sometimes get caught off guard with wacky sacrifices like that.

    Also, I'm always pleased when my opponents choose the Philidor, because I think it gives white a lot to work with. This game is a nice example. Even if the sacrifice isn't 'sound', white still has quite a lot of compensation.

  • 13 mesi fa

    zhouwei

    go Wang hao! keep playing funny games.

  • 13 mesi fa

    Chesspanzer

    Giri got swept off the board..

     

     

    Lol Topalov

  • 13 mesi fa

    Fixing_A_Hole

    Hopefully Ivanchuk can keep his momentum going...he needs a strong tourney result, it has been awhile.  

  • 13 mesi fa

    GeniusKJ

    Probably not. The match will be very close. If both players are in form, then the person with the greater opening prep is at an advantage.

    Anand's prep will be tough to match up to.

  • 13 mesi fa

    GeniusKJ

    Grischuk is about to enter the 2800 club!

    Anand almost out of top 10.

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