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Alan Turing and Run-Around Chess

  • qixel
  • | 15/giu/2010 at 09:07
  • | Pubblicato su: Amy's Blog
  • | 3375 letture
  • | 4 commenti

Alan Turing, one of the fathers of the modern computer and one of the great geniuses of the 20th Century, was also a long-distance runner of some repute.  He was also a mediocre chess player.  But he combined running and chess in a creation usually referred to as "run-around-the-house chess".

The rules are simple:  make a chess move, then run around the house.  Your opponent must make her move before you return to the board.

I don't know if Turing ever actually played this way, because some practical problems come to mind:  What if you live in a mews?  What if you need more time to think?...you just might stroll instead of run.


Alan Turing the Runner

Apparently, the French have discovered a solution to these problems in a game called Condi Chess.   Chessmaster Julius Arnas invented it for the chess camp he runs near Naujac sur Mer, France.  The rules are the same as standard chess but the chess clock is set up some distance away, say 10 meters, on a separate table.  From what I've been able to discover, the idea is catching on, and others are playing it too.

Here's a video of the action (note: skip ahead to 2:20 for Condi Chess, otherwise you'll be watching teenagers standing around for 2 minutes):

Commenti


  • 4 anni fa

    Aliyat-EJ

    qixel wrote:

    I think the site should run a ping pong/chess competition with staff members and televise it on chess.com TV

    I'd put my money on Robby Adamson.

    - EJ

  • 4 anni fa

    qixel

    Aliyat-EJ wrote:

    So, if I run 2 miles in 15 minutes and you run it in 12 minutes our starting time would 12 minutes for me and 15 minutes for you.

     

    Hey, I like that a lot.  Besides boxing and running, I think a lot of sports could be combined with chess. 

    For example, David Pruess mentioned to me that there's a ping pong table at chess.com headquarters.  I think the site should run a ping pong/chess competition with staff members and televise it on chess.com TV.  If you win the ping pong match, say, 21 to 16, you'd get 21 minutes on the clock and your opponent would get 16; or you'd get a 21-second increment and your opponent a 16-second one.

    Or maybe someday there'll be a quadathlon with chess as the final leg.Smile 

  • 4 anni fa

    Aliyat-EJ

    There's a gentleman here in Tucson, who moved from I think it was Oregon. He created a tournament in which the participants run 2 miles. Then they play in a chess tournament in which players get the amount of time on their clock and it took their opponent to run the 2-miles.

    So, if I run 2 miles in 15 minutes and you run it in 12 minutes our starting time would 12 minutes for me and 15 minutes for you.

    He said it was very popular where he was from, but he hasn't organized one down here yet. It sounded interesting.

    - EJ

  • 4 anni fa

    SonofPearl

    What a genius Turing was. Way ahead of his time, and a hero for his code-breaking efforts in WW2. Not sure about run-around-the-house chess, though!  I suppose it would keep me fit! Laughing

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